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Canadian coins | cent | penny | Calgary coin | buy & sell

  CANADIAN ONE CENTS

Calgary Coin offers an across-the-board excerpt of canadian coins including large and belittled cents for sale on the internet and in my memory here in Calgary. I normally have most dates available in a assortment of grades and prices for collectors at all levels, normally priced at a discount from the Canadian Coin News course tabloid price guide .
I normally do not provide images my coins as I have thousands of coins, sometimes multiples of the same coin. Imaging tied a bantam percentage of them would be impossible and putting that many images on my web pages would make them difficult to download, plus for cheap coins the value to the time to create the images would army for the liberation of rwanda exceed the value of the coins. I grade conservatively, describing any significant defects, including minor ones many dealers would not mention. If you always receive a coin from me that you are not satisfied with, please feel detached to return it for a broad refund .
For those unfamiliar with the grade ( quality ) descriptions preceding each price, they are discussed on my canadian Coin Introduction Page .

Prices are in Canadian Dollars

SHORTCUTS TO SECTIONS

Victoria Large, 1858-1901
Edward VII Large, 1902-1910
George V Large, 1911-1920
George V Small, 1920-1936
George VI, 1937-1952
Elizabeth, 1953-1989
Elizabeth, 1990-2012

LARGE CENTS

Most people, including myself, normally refer to these coins as pennies. They are actually 1 cent coins, using the american denomination of a cent and were intended to be equivalent to a british 1/2 penny.

QUEEN VICTORIA
1837 to 1901

Young Head
1858 to 1859

victoria 1858 cent young head

image of young head, 1858 and 1859 type only

The young head victorian coins struck in 1858 and 1859 are pre-Confederation coins for the british Colonial Province of Canada. These first two dates struck to a standard of 100 coins per ram of bronze quite than the british 1/2 pence standard of 80 coins to the pound of bronze. This made the coins unpopular and at first ailing accepted by a public used to the british Standards .
The designs were by Leonard C. Wyon with the writing of the coins being 95 % copper, 4 % tin and 1 % zinc weighing 4.54 grams at 25.4 millimeter ( 1 column inch ) diameter, with decoration conjunction. Although very rare, a few 1859 ‘s exist with neologism alignment due to a 180 degree die rotation error. There are besides a few strike on incorrect brass section blanks .

The 1858 large penny is the rare go steady of canadian large cents although some varieties of early dates are rare .

  1. 1858 ……………………………… VG-8     SOLD
There are several varieties in how the 9 appears on 1859 cents. The most common is a bare specialize 9 with all the digits at the lapp level, and a sub-variety where the 9 slightly lower than the other digits. Sone remaining 1858 dies were modified to 1859 by punching a 9 over the concluding 9 with the 8 still partially visible, resulting in the 9/8 variety. A number of 1859 dies have odd bits of excess decoration around the 9 and are known as the “ double punch ” varieties, as discussion of which can be found in the Charlton standard catalog of canadian Coins .

  1. 1859 narrow ………………. off-color F-15     SOLD
     
  2. 1859 narrow, low 9 …………. cleaned VF-20     SOLD
     
  3. 1859 WIDE 9/8, medal …………… ICCS F-15   $70.00
  4. 1859 WIDE 9/8, medal ………….. ICCS VF-32   $80.00
  5. 1859 WIDE 9/8, medal ………………. VF-30  $110.00
  6. 1859 WIDE 9/8, medal …. ICCS trace red MS-60  $450.00
     
  7. 1859 DOUBLE PUNCH VARIETY ……… ICCS VF-20   $80.00
     
  8. 1859 DOUBLE PUNCH #1 …………… ICCS F-15  $375.00
  9. 1859 DOUBLE PUNCH #1 ………….. ICCS XF-40  $625.00
     
  10. 1859 DOUBLE PUNCH #1 described by NGC only as
    9/9 ….. NGC 2674880-002 AU-DETAILS surface
    hairlines (which are barely noticeable)…….  $800.00
     
  11. 1859 DOUBLE PUNCH #1 ….. PCGS 20745227 AU-53 $1100.00
     
  12. 1859 DOUBLE PUNCH #2 … lightly cleaned VF-20  $100.00

Mature Head
1876 to 1901

victoria cent 1894 old head variety

image of mature head 1876 to 1901 type only

Canada became a state in 1867 but the large number of 1858 and 1859 cents in habit satisfied the neologism requirements of early Canada for 17 years. The foremost Dominion of Canada cents were issued in 1876 at the lapp 80 to a egyptian pound standard of the british 1/2 penny, making them satisfactory to the general population .
The designs are still by Leonard C. Wyon. The alloy remains 95 % bull, 4 % tin and 1 % zinc. The diameter remains 25.4 millimeter ( 1 inch ) but the weight increases to 5.67 grams. The die alliance is coinage conjunction, unlike all other appellation that were decoration alignment .
Until 1907 all canadian coins were struck in England at either the Royal Mint in London without a mint mark, or the Heaton mint at Birmingham with an H mint check. The Heaton mint H is found below the date but above the closed chain of beads on all dates other than 1898 and 1900 when it is below the out leaves about touching the flange .
They all look alike at a glance but there four slenderly unlike portraits of Queen Victoria are found on big cents, known as obverse 1, 2, 3 and 4. In 1876 and 1881 entirely obverse 1 was used. From 1882 to 1886 both obverse 1 and 2 were used. In 1887 and 1888 only obverse 2 was used. In 1890 all have obverse 3. In 1891 both obverse 2 and 3 were used. In 1892 obverse ‘s 2, 3 and 4 were all used. From 1893 to 1901 merely obverse 4 was used. A arrant illustrate discussion of these obverse types can be found in any holocene edition of the Charlton Standard Catalogue of canadian Coins .

I find it interesting that these 1876 H coins, struck at Heaton mint, use the same obverse 1 invention as the London mint coins in following years. In other denominations the Heaton mint dies are different than London mint dies, so it seems probable these 1 penny dies were cut at London for function at Heaton .

  1. 1876 H ………………………. ICCS AU-55   $45.00
  2. 1876 H ………………………. ICCS MS-60   $57.50

The 1876 offspring was fairly big and satisfied Canada ‘s want for 1 cents for several years, resulting in no 1 cent coins struck from 1877 through 1880 .

There are a few minor varieties for 1881, including obverse 1 and 1a, double over punch of respective letters, and some N ‘s missing part of their serif. For the most separate I do not bother to sort these out .

  1. 1881 H …………………………… VF-20     SOLD
     
  2. 1881 H obv 1. ICCS heavy punch doubling VG-10  $200.00
This is the first class with two different portrait varieties, obverse 1 and 2 which I do sort extinct. There are minor varieties of obverse 1/2 or 2/1 arsenic well as some double punch inscription, but I make no attack to sort those out. Obverse 1 and 2 are fairly slowly to sort out, as Victoria ‘s kuki on obverse 1 has a placid line at the buttocks, which on Obverse 2 there is a small dimple on the bottom line of her chin .

  1. 1882 H Obverse 1 ……………… ICCS MS-60   $80.00
     
  2. 1882 H Obverse 2 ……………… ICCS AU-55   $40.00

No 1 penny coins were issued in 1883 .

Both Obverse 1 and 2 occur in 1884, but obverse 1 much scarce than obverse 2 and I suspect they were precisely using up a forget over obverse die in the first place mean for use in 1882 and which most probably had already used on some 1882 coins. This need inquiry because if it is the subject 1884 obverse 1 ‘s should have been struck with a slenderly tire obverse die .

  1. 1884 Obverse 1 ……………………. VF-20     SOLD
     
  2. 1884 Obverse 2 ……………….. ICCS VF-20   $ 8.00

No 1 penny coins were issued in 1885 .

Both obverse ‘s 1 and 2 occur in 1886 but obverse 1 is scarcer than 2 but not american samoa scarce as for 1884. This is the last class in which obverse 1 was used .

  1. 1886 Obverse 1 ……………….. ICCS VF-20     SOLD
     
  2. 1886 Obverse 2 ……………….. ICCS AU-55   $95.00
lone obverse 2 occurs in 1887 .

  1. 1887 ……………….. ICCS trace red MS-62  $125.00
All 1888 cents are obverse 2. Some 1888 cents are found with doubling on separate of the date, with either one or two of the 8 ‘s doubled with those with the center 8 doubled listed by Hans Zoell as RT9e. I by and large do not sort out those varieties .

  1. 1888 ……………………………… VG-8   $ 5.00
  2. 1888 …………………………….. VG-10   $ 5.25
  3. 1888 ……………………………… F-12   $ 5.50

No canadian 1 penny or 50 penny coins were minted in 1889, and the 5, 10 and 25 cents are all scarce. There was an economic contraction in Canada during 1889 and the first base depart of 1890, likely reducing the demand for new coins .

All 1890 are obverse 3. Some examples have a doubled ( re punched ) 8 .

  1. 1890 H ………………………. ICCS XF-40   $40.00
In 1891 there are three major varieties OF large cents, each of which can be found with either obverse 2 or 3 :

1 ) large date with boastfully leaves – LDLL
2 ) little date with large leaves – SDLL
3 ) small date with modest leaves – SDSL
Depending on the reference you are using, the letters designating the kind can be reversed. For exercise, SD LL for Small Date with Large Leaves might besides be designated as LL SD for Large Leaves with Small Date .

  1. 1891 LDLL obverse 2 ……………….. VF-20     SOLD
     
  2. 1891 LDLL obverse 3 ………… cleaned AU-50   $36.00
     
  3. 1891 SDLL obverse 2 …………… ICCS VF-20  $175.00
     
  4. 1891 SDSL obverse 2 …………………. G-6     SOLD
     
  5. 1891 SDSL obverse 3 …………… ICCS VF-30  $137.50
This is the lone class with three dispute obverse types, listed in the references as obverse ‘s 2, 3 and 4. many people have trouble oneself telling these obverse ‘s a part .
The first problem is the references list obverse 3 which was not used in 1892, rather they used 3a which has long upright serif on the plaza of the E ‘s, the only obverse like that. This will be unclutter in all grades. In my opinion this should have been called obverse 5 but as all references call it 3 so I list them that direction .
If you have eliminated obverse 3, obverse 4 has a reasonably heavy jowl line coming down from the mouthpiece bending back along the chew, while the ribbon conclusion on the shoulder is fairly pronounced. As these are not clear on wear specimens you besides look at the dimple under Victoria ‘s chin which is just scantily present so her jaw occupation looks smooth, closer to an obverse 1. obverse 2 has a minor jowl line only coming 1/2 way down from the mouth, does not bend back along the jaw and the ribbon conclusion is weaker closely blending into the shoulder. On wear specimens one should look at the jaw line which on obverse 2 has a fairly discrete dimple in the base .

  1. 1892 obverse 2 ………………… mark VG-8     SOLD
     
  2. 1892 obverse 3 ……………………. VG-10     SOLD
     
  3. 1892 obverse 4 ……….. reverse pitted VG-8     SOLD
From 1893 to 1901 merely obverse 4 was used, so I will not mention any obverse types for these dates .
  1. 1893 ……………………….. BROWN MS-60   $60.00
There is a barely kind in 1894 cent where the 4 is thicker than most examples. Some references call it large and others a thickly 4 but there is no significant size dispute then thick 4 describes it better. In my feel the blockheaded for is scarce, possibly by 50 to 1 .

  1. 1894 ………………………… ICCS AU-50   $65.00
     
  2. 1894 thick 4 …………………. ICCS VF-30     SOLD
  1. 1895 ………………………………. G-6   $ 5.25
  2. 1895 ………………………… ICCS AU-55   $60.00
  3. 1895 ………………….. subdued red MS-65  $480.00
There are two varieties in 1896 with most of the coin a identical evenly separated date but on a few examples the 6 is farther from the 9 resulting in what is known as the FAR 6 assortment. The easiest way to tell the difference is that on the regular diverseness the 6 is centered below the NT of CENTS, but on the Far 6 diverseness the right edge of the 6 is below the leave edge of the T .

  1. 1896 ………………………… mark VG-10     SOLD
     
  2. 1896 FAR 6 ……………………….. VF-20   $40.00
normally coins wear equally on both sides but starting around 1897 and continuing for about 10 years, some large cents were struck with a concave turn back die resulting in a convex reverse which wears more cursorily than the obverse. such coins can be Fine or VF on the portrayal but so far on the rearward the CE of CENTS is very weak or even worn through. There is no standard room to grade such coins indeed will split grade them, listing the obverse grade first and the revoke as G-4 or G-6 depending on how wear it is, and will price them accordingly .
  1. 1897 ………………………. cleaned F-15     SOLD

While not listed in the CCN vogue sheet or the standard listings in the Charlton catalog, the position of the H on the 1898 H 1 penny comes in two major varieties of a low and eminent H. On the high H the top leave of the H will touch or slightly over lay the left above. On the first gear H the H will not touch the leaf at all. On looking at a group of 20 of these right now, there was a approximately even split between the two types so there is no difference in rarity or price and as this is a relatively unimportant variety I will not note this variety show in my listings, but if you are specific about which you want when ordering, I will try to sort it out for you .

  1. 1898 H …………………. edge damage VG-8   $ 4.00
  1. 1899 …………………………….. VG-10   $ 5.00
  2. 1899 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 7.25
  3. 1899 ………………………… ICCS MS-60   $50.00
  1. 1900 …………………………….. VF-20   $20.00
  2. 1900 …………………………….. XF-45   $55.00
  3. 1900 …………………………….. AU-50   $72.50
The 1900 H penny sometimes causes confusion because the H modest and while centered below the date it is between the bottom leaf and the rim denticles and can be unmanageable to see. People are much looking for it above the surround of beads as it is on the 1907 H, so do not see it .

  1. 1900 H ………….. ICCS red and brown MS-63     SOLD
The median timbre in which we see 1900 1 cents is nicer than for earlier dates, reflected in a lower prices for higher grade examples. This was the concluding class for Queen Victoria resulted in people putting these 1 cents to save as the Edward VII designs were introduced. To this day people still do this when a type is phased out, expecting them to one day become rare which actually causing them to be the most coarse and least valuable in the series. We see this with the 1920 large penny, 1936 small penny, 1952 George V cent, and the 2012 concluding issue of the 1 penny .

  1. 1901 …………………… light marks F-12   $ 5.00
  2. 1901 ……………………………… F-15   $ 5.75
  3. 1901 ……………………. edge bump VF-20   $ 5.00
  4. 1901 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 6.50
  5. 1901 …………………… minor mark XF-40   $ 8.00
  6. 1901 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 9.75
  7. 1901 …………………………….. XF-45   $14.00
  8. 1901 …………………………….. AU-50   $20.00
  9. 1901 …………………… ICCS brown MS-60   $40.00

EDWARD VII
1902 to 1910

Canada 1910 cent

image of Edward VII 1902 to 1910, type only

anterior to 1908, canadian mint without a mint chump was struck at the Royal Mint in London England and the 1907 cents With an H mint grade ( centered below the date, above the call of beads ) were struck at the Heaton mint at Birmingham England. Starting in 1908 all canadian cents were struck at the Royal Canadian mint in Ottawa .
This Obverse character was designed by G. W. DeSalles, with the overrule the like type designed by Leonard C. Wyon used since 1858. These were struck from an debase containing 95 % copper, 4 % can and 1 % zinc. The standard weight was 5.67 grams with a diameter of 25.4 millimeter ( 1 inch ) .
While the debase remains the same, something is different starting approximately 1904 as it is common to see coins with streaks of differential gear tone, and sometimes streaks of luster or scatter spots of luster, which are not convention on earlier dates. These suggest the alloys might not have been well interracial then that there are areas of higher and lower tin and zinc contents across one mint, which cause different types of tone. It is besides common to see examples between 1903 to 1909 which tone a much lighter brown than is normal on other dates, but is not ascribable to cleaning .

  1. 1902 …………………………….. VG-10   $ 3.00
  1. 1903 …………………………….. AU-50     SOLD
  1. 1904 ………………………… VG-10/aG-3     SOLD
With a mintage of about 2 million, 1905 is the scarce of the Edward VII boastfully cent, although none of them can be considered rare .

  1. 1905 ……………….. ICCS trace red MS-60     SOLD
  1. 1906 ………………. very rough rims VF-20     SOLD
  1. 1907 ……………………. rough rims F-15     SOLD
The H on a 1907 H is centered below the date, just above the inner ring a beading, unlike some earlier dates where it is lower down between the leaves and the extinct ring of beads. The accurate situation and size of the H varieties slenderly between coins, and on some coins can be very modest .

  1. 1907 H ……………………………. VG-8   $14.00
  2. 1907 H …………………………… VG-10   $17.00
  3. 1907 H ………………………. ICCS VF-30   $40.00
  4. 1907 H ………………………. ICCS XF-40   $50.00
  5. 1907 H ………………………. ICCS AU-55  $125.00

The Royal canadian Mint opened in Ottawa in 1908 after which closely all canadian coins were minted in Canada. While the designs and alloy specification remain the same, there appears to be some type of change in the metallurgy. When they tone they are frequently a pale brown than earlier coins, and if cleaned have are more amber color. Often there are streaks of bright yellow that do not tone adenine much as the perch of the coin, which if light does not affect things but when more dramatic I personally find reasonably unattractive ( I will describe it when dramatic ). I do n’t know adequate about the alloys to say what changed, but I suspect there is an increase in the zinc subject in some specimens ( that could cause the more yellow tinge and different tone ) and poorer quality mix of the alloys than was done in England would explain the streaks .

  1. 1908 ………………………………. G-6   $ 3.50
  1. 1909 ……………………………… VG-8   $ 3.00
  1. 1910 ………………………………. G-6     SOLD

GEORGE V
1911 to 1936

Canada 1911 cent

image of George V, 1911 Godless, type only

This Obverse type was designed by Sir E. B. MacKennal, and the rearward by W. H. J. Blakemore. These were struck from an alloy containing 95 % copper, 4 % tin and 1 % zinc. The standard weight was 5.67 grams with a diameter of 25.4 millimeter ( 1 column inch ). All were struck at the Royal Canadian mint in Ottawa .

George V coins were introduced in 1911 without “ DEI GRATIA “, Latin for “ God ‘s Grace ”, in the obverse inscription. Known as the “ GODLESS COINS ” there was a populace out fad or in 1912 “ DEI GRATIA ” returns to canadian coins making the 1911 ‘s a one year type coin .

  1. 1911 Godless ……………………… XF-45   $ 8.00
  2. 1911 Godless …………….. trace red MS-63   $36.00

Canada 1916 cent

image of George V, 1912 to 1920, type only
  1. 1912 ……………………………… F-15   $ 3.00
  2. 1912 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 5.00
  3. 1912 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 5.50
  4. 1912 ………………………. rubbed XF-45   $ 7.25
  1. 1913 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 3.00
  2. 1913 …………………………….. XF-45   $10.00
With a mintage of about 3.4 million the 1914 is the scarcest date of George V big cents, although alone by a little and lone commands a agio in the higher grades. The 1911 in has a higher mintage but due to being a one year type is in higher demand than the 1914 .

  1. 1914 ……………………………… F-15     SOLD
     
  1. 1915 ……………………………… VG-8   $ 1.75
  2. 1915 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 4.50
  3. 1915 ……………………… cleaned XF-40   $ 3.50
  1. 1916 ……………………………… F-15   $ 1.75
  2. 1916 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 2.00
  3. 1916 thread strike through …………. VF-30   $ 3.00
  1. 1917 ………………….. light marks VF-20   $ 1.25
  2. 1917 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 2.00
  3. 1917 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 3.00
  1. 1918 ……………………………… F-15   $ 1.75
  2. 1918 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 5.00
  1. 1919 ……………………………… F-15   $ 1.75
  2. 1919 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 3.00
  1. 1920 (large) ……………………… VF-20   $ 2.00
  2. 1920 (large) ……………………… VF-30   $ 3.00

1920 was both the death year in which they struck large cents, and the first class in which minor cents were struck. A considerable numeral of the 1920 large cents were melted for hit of 1920 humble cents, but both large and small cents remain relatively common .

To commemorate the Royal Canadian Mint ‘s 90th anniversary, especial sets of coins were struck with the sizes, alloys ( other than the 1 penny ), and cosmopolitan reverse designs of the 1908 coins but Queen Elizabeth ‘s portrayal and the date shown as “ 1908 – 2008 ”. The one penny coins are the entirely large cents struck after 1920, and have the unusual feature of being copper plated flatware, possible the merely copper plated silver coins ever made by any mint. The early sets were struck with an antiqued matte-proof finish that proved unpopular with collectors, but an interesting assortment on the one penny because the couturier forgot to place the give voice “ Canada ” below the Queen ‘s portrayal, making these the merely canadian coin without “ CANADA ” anywhere on it. Sets strike former in the year were issued as mirror-proofs, but with “ CANADA ” added below the Queen ‘s portrait on the one cent coins .

  1. LARGE CENT, 1908-1998 w/o CANADA. MATTE PROOF     SOLD
To commemorate the hundredth anniversary off the 1911 silver dollar extra sets replicating all the denominations of 1911 coins were struck in 2011 coins using the George V portrait and obverse inscription. On the 1 cent the reverse is similar to the 1911 1 penny but the inscription reads 1 CENT CANADA 1911-2011. The alloy of these one cents is pure copper struck to a bright proofread finish, at 5.67 grams, 25.4 millimeter diameter and 1.6 millimeter slurred. Just under 6000 sets were made, so these are relatively barely coins .

  1. LARGE CENT, 1911-2011 ……………… PROOF     SOLD

SMALL CENTS

GEORGE V

canada 1936 1 cent

IMAGE OF 1920 TO 1936, TYPE ONLY

In 1920, largely to reduce the cost of coinage output, the government ceased to issue large cents at the standard of the british half penny, and began striking humble cents of the same weight standard as the american penny. The obverse design is slightly different than that on the big cents and is by Sir E.B. MacKennal, whose initials B.M. appear on the truncation of the broke. The turn back design is a wholly newfangled by Fred Lewis. The admixture besides changed slightly to 95.5 % copper, 3 % can and 1.5 % zinc. The standard weight is 3.24 grams, with a diameter of 19.05 millimeter ( 3/4 inch ) .

  1. 1920 (small cent) ………………….. F-15   $ 0.75
  2. 1920 (small cent) …………………. VF-30   $ 1.50
  3. 1920 (small cent) …………………. XF-40   $ 2.00
  4. 1920 (small cent) …….. red and brown MS-60   $20.00
  5. 1920 (small cent) ……………. brown MS-62   $20.00
  6. 1920 (small cent) …….. red and brown MS-62   $24.00
  7. 1920 (small cent) ………… trace red MS-63   $28.00
  8. 1920 (small cent) .. red but light clean MS-63   $32.00
  9. 1920 (small cent) …….. red and brown MS-63   $40.00
  10. 1920 (small cent) … ICCS red and brown MS-63   $62.50
  11. 1920 (small cent) ……………… red MS-63   $72.50
  1. 1921 ……………………………… F-12   $ 1.00
  2. 1921 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 4.00
  3. 1921 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 9.00
  4. 1921 ………………. lightly cleaned MS-60   $16.00
With a mintage of about 1,2400,000 this is the third lowest mintage of small cents .

  1. 1922 ……………………. dark spots F-12   $24.00
  2. 1922 ……………………………… F-12   $27.00
  3. 1922 …………………………. ICCS F-12   $27.00
  4. 1922 ……………………………… F-15   $32.00
  5. 1922 …………………………….. VF-20   $34.50
  6. 1922 ………………. lightly cleaned VF-30   $32.00
  7. 1922 ………………….. dark streak VF-30   $32.00
  8. 1922 …………………………….. VF-30   $40.00
  9. 1922 ……………………….. marks AU-50   $80.00
With a mintage of just over 1 million, this is the second lowest coinage humble cent, but the deviation between it and 1925 is entirely about 2 %

  1. 1923 ……………………………… VG-8   $38.00
  2. 1923 ……………………………… F-12   $40.00
  3. 1923 ……………………………… F-15   $45.00
  4. 1923 ……………………. rim nicks VF-20   $32.00
  5. 1923 ……………… 2 bright streaks VF-20   $38.00
  6. 1923 …………………………….. VF-20   $50.00
  7. 1923 ………………………… ICCS VF-20   $50.00
  8. 1923 …………………………….. VF-30   $57.50
  9. 1923 ………………………… ICCS VF-30   $57.50
  1. 1924 ……………………………… F-12   $10.00
  2. 1924 …………………………. dark F-15   $10.00
  3. 1924 ……………………………… F-15   $11.50
  4. 1924 ………………………… ICCS AU-50   $60.00
With a mintage of equitable barely over 1 million, this is the lowest mintage date small penny, beating the 1923 by less than 20,000 coins .

  1. 1925 ……………………………… VG-8   $28.00
  2. 1925 ……………………………… F-12   $32.00
  3. 1925 ……………………………… F-15   $38.00
  4. 1925 …………………………….. VF-20   $40.00
  5. 1925 ………………………… ICCS VF-20   $40.00
  6. 1925 ………………….. light marks VF-30   $32.00
  7. 1925 ………………………… ICCS VF-30   $47.50
  8. 1925 ……………………… cleaned XF-45   $38.00
  9. 1925 …………………………….. AU-50   $97.50
  10. 1925 …………………… ICCS brown MS-60  $200.00
  1. 1926 ……………………………… F-12   $ 5.50
  2. 1926 ………………….. uneven color F-15   $ 5.00
  3. 1926 …………………….. dark spot F-15   $ 5.00
  4. 1926 ……………………………… F-15   $ 7.00
  5. 1926 ……………………… cleaned VF-20   $ 5.00
  6. 1926 ……………………. scratches VF-20   $ 5.00
  7. 1926 ………………………. streak VF-20   $ 6.50
  8. 1926 ……………………. edge nick VF-20   $ 6.50
  9. 1926 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 8.00
  10. 1926 ………………….. trace rough VF-30   $ 5.00
  11. 1926 ……………………… scratch VF-30   $ 6.50
  12. 1926 ………………….. light marks VF-30   $ 8.00
  13. 1926 …………………………….. VF-30   $12.00
  14. 1926 ……………………… scratch AU-50   $28.00
  1. 1927 …………………………….. VG-10   $ 2.25
  2. 1927 ……………………………… F-12   $ 2.50
  3. 1927 …………………… light marks F-15   $ 2.00
  4. 1927 ………………… light scrathes F-15   $ 1.50
  5. 1927 ……………………………… F-15   $ 3.25
  6. 1927 ……………………… cleaned VF-20   $ 2.00
  7. 1927 ……………………. rim bumps VF-20   $ 2.00
  8. 1927 ……………………. scratches VF-20   $ 3.00
  9. 1927 …………………. reverse rubs VF-20   $ 3.00
  10. 1927 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 4.00
  11. 1927 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 5.50
  12. 1927 ……………………. trace red AU-50   $20.00
  1. 1928 ……………………………… F-12   $ 0.50
  2. 1928 …………………………….. F-15   $ 0.75
  3. 1928 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 1.00
  4. 1928 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 1.75
There are three major military position varieties of the concluding 9 of 1929, broken, center and high, although every die was probably slenderly unlike and there were many dies with minor differences. All standard references fail to discuss the center 9 variety resulting in people mistaking center 9 examples for high 9 ‘s. Both middle and low 9 ‘s are common so I alone list the high 9 ‘s individually .
canada 1929 low 9 cent
Low 9 (common)
All four digits align at the top.
The final 9 points below the 2.

canada 1929 middle 9 cent
Medium 9 (common)
Both 9’s higher than the 2, aligned at their tops.
The final 9 points along the base of the 2.

canada 1929 high 9 cent
High 9 (scarce)
Top of final 9 is higher than the 192 with
it’s bottom pointing at the base of the 2.

  1. 1929 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 1.75
  2. 1929 …………………………….. AU-58   $16.00
     
  3. 1929 high 9 ………………….. ICCS VF-30     SOLD
  1. 1930 …………………………….. VG-10   $ 3.25
  2. 1930 ……………………………… F-12   $ 3.50
  3. 1930 ……………………………… F-15   $ 4.75
  4. 1930 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 7.25
  5. 1930 ……………….. ICCS trace red MS-62   $80.00
  1. 1931 ……………………………… F-12   $ 1.50
  2. 1931 ……………………………… F-15   $ 2.25
  3. 1931 ……………………… mottled VF-20   $ 2.00
  4. 1931 …………………… small mark VF-20   $ 2.50
  5. 1931 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 3.00
  6. 1931 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 5.00
  1. 1932 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 1.25
  2. 1932 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 2.00
  1. 1933 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 1.25
  2. 1933 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 4.00
  1. 1934 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 1.50
  2. 1934 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 2.00
  1. 1935 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $24.00
  2. 1935 ………………… lacquered red MS-64   $65.00
  1. 1936 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 1.50
  2. 1936 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 2.00
  3. 1936 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 4.00
  4. 1936 ……………………… cleaned AU-50   $ 3.00
  5. 1936 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 5.00
  6. 1936 ……………………… cleaned MS-62   $12.00

GEORGE VI
1937 to 1952

canada 1937 1 cent

IMAGE OF 1937 TO 1947, TYPE ONLY

1937 saw a major deepen in canadian coin designs, making them slightly more artistic, and immediately each canadian denomination had its own classifiable reversion designs ( earlier coins were all variations on the lapp design ) .
The obverse ( common to all the denominations ) was designed by T. H. Paget, whose initials H.P. appear on the truncation of the female chest. The reverse Maple flick design is wholly new and by Kruger Gray, as indicated by the initials K.G. in the lower right battlefield. From 1937 to partway through 1942 these coins were struck from an debase containing 95.5 % copper, 3 % tin and 1.5 % zinc ( the lapp as the earlier modest cents ) but during 1942 the alloy was changed to 98 % bull, 0.5 % canister and 1.5 % zinc. The standard weight is 3.24 grams, with a diameter of 19.05 millimeter ( 3/4 column inch ) .
All dates from 1937 to 1952 are coarse in average mobilize stipulate. Because it is not economic for us to list coins under $ 1.00, some dates will not be listed here unless I have high-grade specimens available .
After 1936, there are no rare date canadian 1 cent coins. While common as dates there are some barely to rare varieties in 1949 ( A to Denticle ) and in 1954 and 1955 the no shoulder fold type. Average circulated examples of all dates ( including coarse varieties of 1949, 1954 and 1955 ) are of excessively small value to warrant list, although we should have them available in the storehouse in foot bins .

  1. 1937 …………………………….. VF-20   $ 0.75
  2. 1937 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 1.00
  3. 1937 ………………… red and brown AU-50   $ 2.50
  4. 1937 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $ 5.00
  1. 1938 …………………………….. AU-55     SOLD
  1. 1939 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 0.75
  2. 1939 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 1.00
  3. 1939 ………………… red and brown MS-64   $10.00
  1. 1940 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 0.50
  2. 1940 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 0.75
  3. 1940 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 1.25
  4. 1940 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 1.00
  5. 1940 …………………………….. AU-55   $ 2.00
  6. 1940 …………………………….. AU-60   $ 3.00
  7. 1940 ……………………. trace red MS-62   $ 4.00
  8. 1940 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $ 5.00
  9. 1940 …………………… red, spots MS-62   $ 5.00
  10. 1940 ……………………. trace red MS-63   $ 5.00
  1. 1941 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 0.50
  2. 1941 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 1.00
  3. 1941 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 1.75
  4. 1941 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $16.00
  1. 1942 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 0.50
  2. 1942 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 0.75
  3. 1942 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 1.25
  4. 1942 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 2.00
  5. 1942 ……. interesting blue/green tone AU-50   $ 2.50
  6. 1942 …………………………….. AU-55   $ 4.00
  7. 1942 ……………………….. brown MS-60   $ 6.50
  8. 1942 ………………… red and brown MS-60   $ 8.00
  9. 1942 ……………………. trace red MS-62   $10.00
  10. 1942 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $16.00
  1. 1943 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1943 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 1.00
  3. 1943 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 1.50
  4. 1943 …………………………….. AU-55   $ 2.75
  5. 1943 ……………………. trace red MS-60   $ 5.00
  6. 1943 ……………………….. brown MS-62   $ 5.00
  7. 1943 ……………………. trace red MS-62   $ 5.50
  1. 1944 …………………………….. VF-30   $ 0.75
  2. 1944 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 1.50
  3. 1944 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 1.75
  4. 1944 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 2.50
  5. 1944 ……………………. trace red MS-60   $10.00
  6. 1944 ………… interesting green tone MS-60   $11.50
  7. 1944 ………………… red and brown MS-60   $12.00
  8. 1944 ………………… red and brown MS-63   $36.00
  1. 1945 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 0.75
  2. 1945 ……. interesting blue/green tone AU-50   $ 1.00
  3. 1945 ………………….. subdued red AU-55   $ 2.50
  4. 1945 …………………………….. MS-60   $ 3.00
  5. 1945 ……….. lacquered red and brown MS-65   $80.00
  1. 1946 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1946 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 0.75
  1. 1947 …………………………….. XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1947 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 0.75

India received its independence on August 14, 1947 requiring that IND IMP ( India ‘s Emperor ) be removed from all british Commonwealth coins date 1948 or newer. A trouble exchangeable to that in 1937 when Edward the VIII abdicated, the newly obverse designs for coins all over the british Commonwealth had to be prepared at the Royal Mint in England. Those for Canada were not ready at the beginning of 1948 and coins were needed, so early in 1948 coins were struck date 1947 so that the IND IMP design could placid be used but a humble maple leaf was placed after the date bespeak minted in 1948 .

Pointed and blunt 7 ‘s based on the shape of the point of the 7 next to the maple twig occur on 1947 maple leaf cents. The blunt 7 is slenderly scarcer than the pointed 7, but there is not much deviation in value .

  1. 1947 ML pointed 7 …………………. XF-45   $ 0.75
  2. 1947 ML pointed 7 …………………. AU-50   $ 1.00
  3. 1947 ML pointed 7 …………………. MS-60   $ 3.00
  4. 1947 ML pointed 7 …….. red and brown MS-62   $ 5.00
     
  5. 1947 ML blunt 7 …………… ICCS red MS-64     SOLD

When the fresh designs arrived in 1948 with IND IMP ( India ‘s Emperor ) removed, the stallion dedication now reads GEORGIVS VI DEI GRATIA REX ( George VI By The Grace of God King ) and was used until 1952. Both 1948 and 1949 cents are found with an obverse diverseness where the concluding ampere of GRATIA points either between two denticles ( known as either A between or A off denticle ), or directly at a denticle ( known as A to or A at denticle ).

canada 1949 1 cent

IMAGE OF 1948 TO 1952, TYPE ONLY
In 1948 both the A to and A off denticle varieties are relatively common and of equal value if it points to the big denticles. These varieties refer to how the final examination ampere of a GRATIA steer at or between two denticles. There is a scarce kind where the A points to a small denticle but I rarely have one available. The small denticles are about the same duration as the wide, but they are slender so the gap between them is wider. If you look at the I in GRATIA it precisely scantily overlap two small denticles but on a bombastic denticle it intelligibly overlaps them going about 1/2 way across each of them .

  1. 1948 A to large denticle …………… XF-40   $ 1.00
  2. 1948 A to large denticle …………… XF-45   $ 1.25
  3. 1948 A to large denticle …………… AU-50   $ 1.50
  4. 1948 A to large denticle. die break … AU-50   $ 1.50
     
  5. 1948 canada cent
    enlargement

    1948 A to large denticle … subdued red MS-65  $200.00
     

  6. 1948 A off large denticles,red and brown MS-62     SOLD
For 1949 the A between denticles ( besides known as the A off denticles ) is common while the A to denticle scarce. Both types have large denticles .

  1. 1949 A off denticle ……………….. AU-50   $ 1.00
  2. 1949 A off denticle ……………….. AU-55   $ 2.00
  3. 1949 A off denticle ………. trace red MS-60   $ 3.00
  4. 1949 A off denticle …… red and brown MS-62   $ 5.00
  5. 1949 A off denticle …….. subdued red MS-62   $ 5.50
     
  6. 1949 A to denticle …………………. F-12   $ 8.00
  7. 1949 A to denticle …………………. F-15   $10.00
  8. 1949 A to denticle ………………… VF-20   $12.00
  9. 1949 A to denticle ………………… VF-30   $16.00
  10. 1949 A to denticle ………………… XF-45   $26.00
  11. 1949 A to denticle ……………. mark AU-50   $24.00
  12. 1949 A to denticle ……………. ICCS AU-55   $45.00
  1. 1950 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 0.50
  2. 1950 ……………………. trace red MS-60   $ 2.00
  3. 1950 ………………… red and brown MS-60   $ 2.50
  4. 1950 ……………………. trace red MS-62   $ 3.00
  5. 1950 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $ 4.00
  6. 1950 ………………….. subdued red MS-62   $ 5.00
  7. 1950 …………………… spotty red MS-63   $ 8.00
  8. 1950 ………………… rainbow toned MS-63   $12.00
  1. 1951 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 0.50
  2. 1951 …………………………….. AU-55   $ 1.00
  3. 1951 …………………………….. MS-60   $ 2.00
  4. 1951 ………………… red and brown MS-60   $ 2.50
  5. 1951 ……………………. trace red MS-62   $ 2.50
  6. 1951 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $ 4.00
  7. 1951 ………….. very small spots red MS-63   $12.00
  8. 1951 …………………………. red MS-63   $14.50
  1. 1952 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 0.50
  2. 1952 …………………………….. AU-55   $ 1.00

ELIZABETH II
1953 to date

canada 1959 1 cent

IMAGE OF 1953 TO 1964, TYPE ONLY

1953 saw the introduction of Elizabeth II ‘s portrait designed by Mary Gillick, whose initials appear on the female chest truncation. The reverse remains Kruger-Gray ‘s maple leaf plan, with his initials in the lower right. The flans remain 19.05 millimeter, 3.25 grams of 98 % copper, 0.5 % can and 1.5 % zinc

The early 1953 dies had the shoulder excessively deeply cut into the die, and the alloy could not be pushed far enough in to capture the shoulder fold design resulting in the shoulder fold usual not portray, although on some well strike examples you may see traces of it. The Queen ‘s shoulder appeared bare which many felt was inappropriate. Known as the No Shoulder Strap ( NSS ) or No Shoulder Fold ( NSF ) kind, it is best to confirm this type by the solid serif at the top and bottom of the I ‘s in II and DEI .

  1. 1953 NSS …………………………. AU-50   $ 0.50
  2. 1953 NSS …………………………. AU-55   $ 0.75
  3. 1953 NSS …………………………. MS-60   $ 1.00
  4. 1953 NSS …………….. red and brown MS-62   $ 1.50
late in 1953 the dies were re-designed so the shoulder fold would strike better and be visible on most examples, although not on some weaker strikes and it is a senior high school target of the coin so it might wear off on examples VF or below. Known as the Shoulder Strap ( SS ) or Shoulder Fold ( SF ) variety, the serif at the top and bottom of the I ‘s were made much smaller so those I ‘s about appear neat, which is the best room to confirm this character. This is the scarce of the two types .

  1. 1953 SS ………………………….. VF-30   $ 3.00
  2. 1953 SS ……………….. light marks XF-40   $ 3.00

From 1954 to 1964 the obverse shoulder fold purpose was intended for all examples but some 1954 proof-like sets contain cents struck with a 1953 NSS die resulting a 1954 NSF variety show. No 1954 circulation strikes were struck with this variety show but some PL sets were broken up and spent thus go around examples have occasionally turned up ( I have lone ever seen one ). In 1955 some circulation strikes were struck from a impart over 1953 die, resulting in a 1955 NSS variety that is not found in mint sets. Fraudsters have been known polish the shoulder fold lines off even examples, and some regular strikes are weakly fall upon so the shoulder fold does not show, but in both cases the I ‘s will not be serifed so it is crucial to check that letter form to confirm these varieties .

note that 1954 cents in Proof-like quality will normally have slenderly purple-red tone and are considered “ bolshevik ” that means. I am not certain why this timbre only happens on this date .

  1. 1954 …………………………….. XF-45   $ 0.75
  2. 1954 …………………………….. AU-50   $ 1.00
  3. 1954 …………………………….. AU-55   $ 1.50
  4. 1954 ………………… red and brown MS-60   $ 2.50
  5. 1954 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $ 3.00
  6. 1954 …………………………. red MS-62   $ 4.00
  7. 1954 ………………… red and brown MS-63   $ 5.00
  8. 1954 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 6.50
  9. 1954 ………………… red and brown MS-64   $12.00
  10. 1954 …………………………. red MS-64   $24.00
  11. 1954 … some light grey spots, ICCS red MS-64   $20.00
  12. 1954 ……………………. trace red MS-65   $25.00
In 1954 one of the dies used on Proof-like coins for the official mint sets was of the NSS diverseness and can be differentiated by the heavily Serifed I ‘s on the obverse. It appears it may have been adenine many as 1 in 20 PL sets had these, and like most 1954 PL cents they normally have the purple-red tone. No 1954 NSS cents were issued for circulation via bank rolls and while I have seen a circle one it was likely from a mint set person broke up and exhausted .

  1. 1954 NSS .. darker purple-red as is normal on
    these ……………………. ICCS red PL-66     SOLD
  1. 1955 …………. red with finger print MS-60   $ 0.50
  2. 1955 …………………………. red MS-60   $ 1.00
  3. 1955 ………………… red and brown MS-62   $ 1.00
  4. 1955 …………………………. red MS-62   $ 1.25
  5. 1955 ……. red but obverse darker area MS-63   $ 3.00
  6. 1955 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 4.00
  7. 1955 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 8.00
All 1955 circulation strikes were intended to be the shoulder fold variety but a leave over 1953 NSF obverse die appears to have been unintentionally used, resulting in 1955 NSF examples. These coins always look slightly worn, even in mint discipline, resulting from that die been slightly wear when first used on these. One must look at both sides of a 1955 NSF cent and the grad will be based more on the rearward design which was struck with a fresh die. As with the 1953 and 1954 NSS varieties the heavy serif on the I ‘s is how you identify these .

  1. 1955 NSS …………………………. VF-20     SOLD
  1. 1956 ……………. ICCS red corrosion MS-63   $ 2.00
  1. 1957 …………………………. red MS-63     SOLD
  1. 1958 ……… very slightly subdued RED MS-64   $ 5.00
  2. 1958 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 8.00
  3. 1958 ……… very slightly subdued RED MS-65   $16.00
  4. 1958 ……. toned spots along edge Proof-like   $ 8.00
  1. 1959 ………. iridescent Red and Brown MS-63   $ 0.75
  2. 1959 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.75
  1. 1960 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.75
  2. 1960 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1960 …………………………. red MS-65   $16.00
  1. 1961 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.75
  2. 1961 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1961 …………………………. red MS-65   $16.00
  1. 1962 ………….. slightly subdued red MS-64   $ 5.00
  2. 1962 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1962 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  4. 1963 …………………… cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.00
Some 1962 cents have considerable doubling on stopping point three digits of the date with the touch under date shifted up slightly from the independent date. Known as the DOUBLE DATE variety, it is very exchangeable to that seen on some 1962 5 cents, suggesting machine doubling where a problem with the minting press causes the die to bounce or rock during striking creating a slenderly double affect with an off-set, where both the 1 and 5 cents with this have struck on the like bid. This kind was listed by Zoell as # D86p .

  1. 1962 double date …………………. XF-40     SOLD

canada 1962 harp variety 1 cent

Some 1962 dies have vertical lines between the 1 of 1 CENT and the notch in the maple leaf, probably die polish marks. normally known as the HARP but when the lines are stronger at the bottomland it is besides known as the GUITAR variety. While not listed in the standard catalogues Hans Zoell catalogues it as # K86c .

  1. 1962 harp variety ……… finger print M2-62   $ 3.50
  2. 1962 harp variety ……… finger print M2-63   $ 5.00
  3. 1962 harp variety ……… finger print M2-64   $ 7.00
  4. 1962 harp variety ……………… red M2-64   $ 8.50
     

canada 1962 hanging 2 cent

A die clash caused the Queen ‘s chin to be transferred to one turn back 1962 penny fail, resulting in a dim line curling from the leave maple leaf to the top of the 2, known as the “ hang 2 ” variety show .

  1. 1962 hanging 2 ……….. red and brown MS-62   $ 4.50
  2. 1962 hanging 2 ………………… red MS-63   $ 6.00
  1. 1963 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1963 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1963 …………………………. red MS-65   $13.50
  4. 1963 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
A die clash caused an outline of the Queen ‘s chin to transferred to one invert 1963 cent die, resulting in a faint line curling from the leave maple leaf to the top of the 3 and is known as the Hanging 3 assortment .

  1. 1963 hanging 3 ……….. red and brown MS-62   $ 4.50
  2. 1963 hanging 3 ………………… red MS-62   $ 5.00

  1. 1964 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1964 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1964 …………………….. ICCS red MS-65   $13.50
  4. 1964 …………………………. red MS-65   $13.50
  5. 1964 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  6. 1964 ……………… heavy cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 5.00

ELIZABETH II

Mature Head Series

canada 1965 1 cent

IMAGE OF 1965 to 1966 and 1968 to 1978, TYPE ONLY

1965 saw an updated more mature portrayal of the Queen wearing a tiara, by Arnold Machin. The reverse design by Kruger-Gray was retained unaltered, as was the specifications of 3.24 grams, 19.05 millimeter, of 98 % copper, 0.5 % tin and 1.5 % zinc .

There are four varieties of the 1965 cent, based on the size of the beads around the Queen ‘s headway, and the shape of the top right of the 5 :

TYPE 1 : belittled beads, pointed 5
TYPE 2 : small beads, blunt 5
TYPE 3 : large beads, blunt 5
TYPE 4 : large beads, pointed 5
Both character 2 and 3 with a numb 5 are coarse. It is generally thought that type 4 ( pointed 5, large beading ) is the scarcest type, but in my experience type 1 ( pointed 5, humble bead ) is actually more difficult to find, although priced far less in the monetary value guides .
many type 4 examples parade doubling of the INA in REGINA and the beads opposite REGINA, which is coarse and illustrate below. The double of the drop makes it look like a humble bead over large beading, but it is the lower outline of the bead that defines the drop size, which is confirmed by the A point at that lower outline, while on the modest bead the A points between two beads ( slightly closer to the lower drop ). The beads on a T-3 with boastfully drop normally do not exhibit that doubling .

canada 1965 pointed 5
POINTED 5

canada 1965 blunt 5
BLUNT 5

canada 1965 large bead 5

Large Beads
A points at bead.

canada 1965 small bead 5
Small bead
A points between beads.
  1. 1965 type 1 ………………………. XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1965 type 1 ………….. red and brown AU-55   $ 1.75
  3. 1965 type 1 ………….. red and brown MS-63   $ 5.00
  4. 1965 type 1 …………………… red MS-63   $ 5.75
  5. 1965 type 1 ………….. red and brown MS-64   $10.00
  6. 1965 type 1 …………………… red MS-64   $16.00
     
  7. 1965 type 2 …………………… red MS-63   $ 0.50
  8. 1965 type 2 …………………… red MS-64   $ 6.50
  9. 1965 type 2 …………………… red MS-65   $14.00
  10. 1965 type 2 ………………….. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
     
  11. 1965 type 3 …………………… red MS-64   $ 6.50
  12. 1965 type 3 …………………… red MS-65   $14.50
     
  13. 1965 type 4 ………………………. XF-40   $ 6.50
  14. 1965 type 4 ………………………. XF-45   $ 9.00
  15. 1965 type 4 ………………………. AU-50   $11.50
  16. 1965 type 4 ………………………. AU-55   $15.50
  17. 1965 type 4 …………………. brown MS-60   $17.50
  18. 1965 type 4 ………….. red and brown MS-60   $20.00
  19. 1965 type 4 …………………… red MS-60   $24.00
  20. 1965 type 4 …………………. brown MS-62   $22.50
  21. 1965 type 4 ……. spotty red and brown MS-62   $28.00
  22. 1965 type 4 ………….. red and brown MS-62   $30.00
  23. 1965 type 4 ………….. red and brown MS-62   $33.00
  24. 1965 type 4 ……………… spots red MS-63   $40.00
  25. 1965 type 4 …………………… red MS-63   $48.00
  26. 1965 type 4 ………………. ICCS red MS-63   $48.00
  27. 1965 type 4 ………….. red and brown MS-64   $48.00
  28. 1965 type 4 ………. red and brown/red MS-64   $65.00
  29. 1965 type 4 …………………… red MS-64   $72.00
  1. 1966 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1966 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1966 …………………….. ICCS red MS-65   $16.00
  4. 1966 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  5. 1966 …………………… cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.25
In celebration of Canada ‘s hundredth anniversary of Confederation, all coins issued depicting an animal common to Canada, with a dive by Alex Covillie on the 1 penny. These were struck in huge numbers and are very common now, flush in grades up to MS-63. Lesser one have very little rate .

  1. 1967, Dove ……………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1967, Dove ……………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50

Please note that up to 2011 when I describe a coin to be Proof-like (PL) I mean a coin from a mint set, intestinally struck to a higher quality than normal, but worth less than a MS (Mint State) coin from a bank roll in the same grade. They are fairly easily differentiated by their strike and luster. ICCS and some references call such coins NON-CIRCULATING NUMISMATIC MINT STATE which I feel will cause confusion in beginning collectors. Starting in 2012 the mint stopped making intentionally nicer coins for the standard sets and the coins are all simply MS (mint state) except for specimen and proof examples.

  1. 1968 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1968 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1968 …………………………. red MS-65   $ 6.50
  4. 1968 ……………… heavy cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 5.00
  1. 1969 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1969 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1969 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50
  4. 1969 …………………… cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.25
  1. 1970 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1970 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1970 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

Beginning in 1971, the mint begins striking three unlike striking qualities of coins, with a one-fourth added in 1981 :

Mint state ( abbreviated MS ) which are coins struck for issue through the banks and have average shininess and surface qualities. In most cases MS coins have little prize unless in the highest range of the MS coins, and those are rarely seen. I do n’t list most dates in MS because they are not of high adequate value to justify the time and trouble to list and/or ship them.

Proof-like ( abbreviated PL ) are standard mint set coins, normally from the pliofilm packaged sets, crimson double penny sets, and late the amobarbital sodium book set, but in later dates there were a variety of other types of sets they can come from. PL coins have a much higher luster than MS coins, by and large because they are struck from dies in their newest die country. They besides have identical minimal marks ( the average PL is a PL-64 ) as they did not go through angstrom many of the mint cover processes as MS coins do, but they are not perfect coins and one should not expect them to be absolutely scratch unblock.

Specimen ( abbreviated SP or SPEC ) which were in the black leather double dollar sets from 1971 to 1980, and for late dates in respective types sets. Like PL coins they are struck from dies in their freshest die state but differ in being double strike to give them a higher luster and shrill images, and they do not go through any mint handle processes before going into the sets so are closely set free. The rims tend and edges tend to be a little sharper although this is not obvious on a casual inspection. When I list a mint as a specimen, it is because I personally took it from a specimen set before listing it here.

Proof ( abbreviated PR ) coins are identical dainty coins found by and large issued in the double dollar black leather boxed proof sets starting in 1981, although some specialization coins did come other ways. The coins are clearly differing from the other fall qualities by being double strike from specially prepare dies so they have mirror fields and frosted images ( and extremist cameo effect ) and are specially handled indeed they go into the sets in approximate arrant condition as possible .

  1. 1971 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1971 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  1. 1972 …………………………. red MS-64     SOLD
  1. 1973 …………………………. red MS-63     SOLD
  1. 1974 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  1. 1975 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1975 …………………… mostly red MS-64   $ 4.00
  3. 1975 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  4. 1975 ………………. minor spots red MS-65   $11.50
  5. 1975 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  1. 1976 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE     SOLD
  1. 1977 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1977 …………………….. spot red MS-64   $ 5.00
  3. 1977 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 8.00
  4. 1977 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  5. 1977 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  1. 1978 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  1. 1979 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 8.00
  2. 1979 ……………….. tiny spots red MS-65   $12.00
  3. 1979 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  4. 1979 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
Some 1979 cents show clear doubling on the date and occasionally early parts of the design. The come and accurate position of the doubling varies from mint to coin consistent with machine doubling were a slightly loose die creates the doubling when it bounces on striking. Examples with excess impregnable double, specially if all four digits are doubled command a premium. While not expensive, these are slender difficult to find .

  1. 1979 double date ……. minor spots red MS-64   $10.00
  2. 1979 double date ………………. red MS-64   $20.00
  3. 1979 double date minor obverse doubl red MS-64   $20.00
  4. 1979 double date ……. minor spots red MS-65   $25.00
  5. 1979 double date ………………. red MS-65   $30.00

In 1980 while the design and alloy remain the same but the weight was reduced from 3.24 grams to 2.8 grams, the diameter from 19.05 mm to 19.00 millimeter, and the thickness from about 1.5 mm to 1.38 mm. Most people did not notice the change and while a 0.44 gram weight decrease does not sound like much, with a mintage of about 1 billion coins per year the raw material savings to the mint was huge. This standard was only used in 1980 and 1981 .

  1. 1980 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.50

1981 saw the introduction of proof sets to replace the doubly dollar specimen sets. The proof coins have frosted images against mirror fields and while specimen strikes continued to be struck, they were in other types of sets. Proof sets proved more popular than specimen sets so proof coins of this period are fairly abundant but both continued to be struck right up to 2012 end of the one penny .

  1. 1981 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 8.00
  2. 1981 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  3. 1981 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 2.00

In 1982 the weigh was again reduced, from 2.8 grams to 2.5 grams even sturdy the diameter increased from 19.00 mm to 19.1 millimeter. This was achieved by a transfer from round to 12 sided therefore decreasing the come of metallic element needed to achieve that diameter. The debase remained the same but there was a minor design alteration to the turn back where the denticle border was replaced by a bead frame .

  1. 1982 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 2.00
1983 cents are found in two varieties in the beads around the Queen ‘s head. The far bead variety show has slenderly smaller beads closely 1/2 way between the rim and the point of the Queen ‘s female chest. The approach bead variety show beads are slightly larger and lone about 1/3 of the way between the rim and the break. This can be difficult to determine unless you have the two slope by side to compare .
Both varieties are found in MS, Proof-like, Specimen and Proof quality. The CCN course sheet and the Charlton Standard Catalogue both list the far bead is the more common in all strike qualities. In my have that is true for MS the about bead is more coarse in Proof-like, Specimen and Proof quality .

  1. 1983 near bead ……………….. PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.00
  1. 1984 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1984 ………………. minor spots red MS-64   $ 6.00
  3. 1984 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  4. 1984 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 2.00
1985 cents are identical common with a blunt 5 ( straight up and down on the top front of the 5 ) and is found in all affect qualities. The point 5 variety show ( front top of the 5 angles to the right ) is much scarce and entirely found circulation ( MS ) strikes, never in mint sets. I rarely have the pointed 5 available and based on recent sales on ebay the CCN course listings well below the veridical market values for this type .

  1. 1985 blunt 5 ………………….. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1985 blunt 5 ………………….. red MS-64   $ 8.50
  3. 1985 blunt 5 ……………………… PROOF   $ 2.00
     
  4. 1985 pointed 5 ………………… red MS-63     SOLD
  1. 1986 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 2.00
  1. 1987 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  2. 1987 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 2.00
  1. 1988 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  1. 1989 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 2.00

ELIZABETH II

Crowned Head Series

canada 2003 1 cent

IMAGE OF 1990 to 1991, 1993 to 2001, and 2003, TYPE ONLY

1990 learn and update the Queen ‘s portrayal to a more mature style wearing a crown, designed by Dora de Pedery-Hunt. This issue caused some concern when many people noticed the Queen was wearing a King ‘s crown rather than a Queen ‘s crown, and people thought it was an mistake that would be recalled. That crown was designed for George IV around 1830 to be a comfortable unaccented burden crown, and has been worn by every King and Queen ( including Elizabeth ) since then, and is the correct crown for the design of these coins. Kruger-Gray ‘s maple leaf design remains on the rearward, as does the debase of 98 % copper, 0.5 % tin and 1.5 % zinc, with 12 sides at 19.1 millimeter and 2.5 grams .

  1. 1990 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE     SOLD
  1. 1991 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 8.00
  2. 1991 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 2.50
  3. 1991 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 4.00
1992 was Canada ‘s hundred-and-twenty-fifth anniversary of confederation, and all 1 cents of this year have the go steady shown as the double date 1867-1992 .

  1. 1992, double dated …………….. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1992, double dated …………….. red MS-64   $ 8.00
  3. 1992, double dated ……………. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  4. 1992, double dated ……………… SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
  5. 1992, double dated ………………… PROOF   $ 3.00
  1. 1993 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  2. 1993 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  3. 1993 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  1. 1994 …………………………. red MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 1994 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  3. 1994 ………………. minor spots red MS-65   $12.00
  4. 1994 …………………………. red MS-65   $16.00
  1. 1995 …………………………….. PROOF     SOLD

Starting with 1996, on 1 cents with the proof-like strikes, the finish is different than in former years. rather of the overall high shininess finish over the stallion coins, the 1996 cents have a flatness finish with high luster merely on the portrait and maple leaves. The result is more like a reverse of the cameo proof, although the degree of contrast is not consistent and some are slightly more dramatic than others .

  1. 1996 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 5.00

1997 saw a major change in the penny coins. The designs remained the same with the mature crowned bust of the Queen by Dora de Pedery-Hunt, and reverse maple flick design by Kruger-Gray, but the alloy was changed to a pure zinc core plated with copper. The coins were made round ( preferably than 12 sided ) and are 19.05 mm with the reduce weight 2.25 grams. From 1997 to 2000 all 1 penny in MS, Proof-like and Specimen strikes were on these modern blanks but Proof coins continue on solid bronze flans. I recently examined a 1997 specimen set, and found no clear eminence between the Proof-like and specimen 1 cents as both had the flat backgrounds and higher luster designs. When I list them as PL or Specimen it is because I personally took them out of the appropriate sets .

  1. 1997 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1997 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 1997 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 5.00
In 1998 a W mint mark was placed below the Queen ‘s head on coins minted at Winnipeg, although those were all in proof-like sets. Coins struck at Ottawa, including those in mint sets made at Ottawa in later years, have no mint stigmatize. All circulation ( MS ), specimen and proof coins were without mint notice. The finish on 1998 proof-like coins returns to high luster eat up, while specimen coins retain the slightly felt finish up fields with high luster designs that first appeared in 1996 .

  1. 1998 Ottawa ……………………. SPECIMEN   $ 2.50
  2. 1998 Ottawa ………………………. PROOF   $ 5.00
     
  3. 1998 W ………………………. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD

In 1999, the mint sets were all minted in Ottawa so do not have a mint target. The proof-like coins all have the high luster complete while the specimen coins have the undefined reverse cameo stopping point. I have noted that a high percentage of 1999 proof-like cents have a surface with a lot of identical small ( about microscopic ) bubbles, probably resulting from problems with the plating process while copper plating the coins with the zinc core. If ordering one of these in Proof-like striking you should expect it to have that feature of speech. The Specimen strikes do not seem to have this trouble, nor do the proof strikes while are solid bronze blanks thus are not plated .

  1. 1999 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1999 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
  3. 1999 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 5.00
As a cost salvage measure in 1999 the canadian Mint made plans to strike 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 penny coins on plat steel blanks. The one cents look like copper as they were foremost nickel plated then copper plated prior to striking. All other appellation were nickel plated, then copper plated, then nickel plated again so they looked like nickel coins. A P for plated on steel was placed below the Queen ‘s portrayal so they could be differentiated .
First struck merely as test tokens for vending machine companies to calibrate their equipment to and the companies were supposed to return them to the mint when done with them. Some came on the market at very high gear prices, up setting mint officials who struck an extra 20,000 sets to sell to collectors at much lower prices, both making money for the mint and disrupting the grocery store for those vending machine companies .
Packaged like Proof-like sets their demand status is indecipherable and while I prefer to call them Proof-likes, others including ICCS call them Mint State ( or Uncirculated ). The mintage of entirely 20,000 makes them about american samoa barely as 1948 dollars but at a bantam divide of the price. The vinyl packaging much leaves a lighter film on them which can be removed with rubbing alcohol .
I recently bought a bombastic group of world coins from a company that has used them to test their equipment to make certain it would not accept them as canadian coins. The same company used the 1999 P test coins on their equipment to be surely they would be accepted and in the like group I found a number of 1999 P cents that are dependable test token examples and from different dies that the 1999 P cents in the sets the mint sold. The dies were more incautiously finished with two discrete varieties. One had a number of scratches on the die precisely to the forget of the I in ELIZABETH, resulting in raised lines on the coins. The second type has excess metallic element around the EL in Elizabeth and the P scratch. I had a count of each that were identical in these features showing they were on the dies quite than striking defects. The dies used for the P cents in the mint sets were absolutely cut .

  1. 1999 P from mint set …………………. PL     SOLD
     
  2. 1999 P genuine test token …………. AU-UNC   $40.00
Most 2000 coins in all fall upon qualities have nothing below the Queen ‘s flop. A few identical rare examples exist with the P and are incidentally released test coins. Some of the PL and Specimen coins come with the W for Winnipeg below the break. PL coins have a high luster even finish. Specimen coins have high shininess images with flatness backgrounds .

  1. 2000 ………………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 2000 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
  3. 2000 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 5.00
     
  4. 2000 W ………………………. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD

Beginning in 2001, 1 penny coins come in three alloys. MS, Proof-like and specimens coins are found with a P ( for plated ) below the Queen ‘s portrait if the flans are copper plated on steel, without the P if the flans are copper plated zinc, except all proof coins are on solid bronze or copper flans ( depending on the year ) with nothing below the Queen ‘s burst .

  1. 2001 …………………………. red MS-64   $ 6.50
  2. 2001 …………………………. red MS-65   $12.50
  3. 2001 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 5.00
     
  4. 2001 P ………………………. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD

2002 cent

2002 cents were partially of a limited publish for the Queen ‘s fiftieth anniversary, with the date on the obverse below the Queen ‘s portrayal written as the double date 1952-2002. I have had many telephone calls from people saying they had a 1 cent with no date on it, but they need only turn the mint over and look below the portrait to find one .

  1. 2002 …………………………….. PROOF     SOLD
     
  2. 2002 P ………………………. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00

2003 was an interest year for canadian coins, with a number of varieties including the introduction of a new effigy of the Queen without a crown .

Coins struck earlier in 2003 have the crowned effigy of the Queen first introduced in 1990 and are found both with a P below the Queen ‘s break on plat sword or without the P if on plat zinc ( MS entirely ) and on solid tan blanks from proof sets. Those without the P on plated zinc blank by and large have a textured open due to plating trouble, which is to be expected but I will mention it if the textures are courser than normal. Most proof-like and all specimen and normal validation sets in 2003 are of this bust type. The mint had a batch of plating problems at this time, and many of the MS coins have a pebbled surfaces caused by the plat summons .
There were two special issued in 2003. The first was included in the covers of mint reports with a mintage of less than 8,000 and have a Proof finish but selective gold plating on the Maple Leaves giving them a green appearance. The second was in a special issue proof set for the fiftieth anniversary of the Queen ‘ coronation and used the young head from the 1953 type, flank by the dates 1953 and 2003 .

  1. 2003 old effigy ……. surface pebbling MS-64   $ 5.00
  2. 2003 old effigy …………………… MS-64   $ 5.00
  3. 2003 old effigy …………………… PROOF   $ 5.00
     
  4. 2003 P old effigy …………….. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD
     
  5. 2003 gold leaves from mint report …… Proof   $40.00
  6. 2003 gold leaves still in mint report .. Proof   $50.00
     
late in 2003, to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of her coronation, randomness new Coronation Portrait was introduced depicting a more mature Queen without a crown. This became the standard portrayal for later years then is more normally known as the New Effigy. These are found on non-magnetic copper plated zinc blanks without the P and magnetic examples on copper plated steel blanks with the P, both found only as MS examples in bank rolls ( as I am writing this the CCN drift sail lists both in PL quality but I believe that is an error ). Some special are found in edition proof-like sets were struck at Winnipeg with the W mint mark beside the P, the merely neologism where the W and P together ( on 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 cents ) .

  1. 2003 p new effigy …………………. MS-64   $ 0.50
  2. 2003 p new effigy …………………. MS-64   $ 5.00
  3. 2003 p new effigy …………………. MS-65   $12.00
     
  4. 2003 WP new effigy ……………. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD

2004 and all belated dates use the modern effigy portrait. circulation rap ( MS ) coins occur on both copper plated steel flans with the P below the Queen ‘s pass, and copper plated zinc flans without the P. Proof-like and specimen coins entirely exist with the P on plated steel blanks. Proof coins are on pure copper or bronze flans without the P. As in previous few years, Proof-like coins have an over all even lustre while specimen examples have high luster designs with flat backgrounds. Proof strikes with gold plated leaves exist on copper plated zinc flans from mint report covers .

  1. 2004 ………………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
     
  2. 2004 P ………………………. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD
2005 circulation fall upon ( MS ) coins are found on bull plated steel flans with the P and bull plated zinc flans without the P. Proof coins are on saturated copper flans. As with the previous few years, Proof-like coins have an over all tied lustre while Specimen strikes have gamey shininess designs with matte backgrounds. Proof strikes with gold plated leaf besides exist on copper plated zinc flans for the mint report covers .

  1. 2005 …………………………….. MS-65   $12.00
  2. 2005 …………………………….. PROOF   $ 8.00
     
  3. 2005 P ………………………… SPECIMEN     SOLD

2006 is the class the mint logo first appears canadian 1 cents. early 2006 coins silent have the P ( plated on steel ) and non-P ( plated on zinc ). late in 2006 and continuing for the following years both types were placid made in all coins have a stylize maple leaf mint logo below the portrait and alone room to tell them a separate is with a magnet. Proof strikes continue to be on non-plated solid bull or tan blanks with nothing below the flop .

With all the different P, no-P, and logo dies used in 2006, occasionally flans got mix up and plated zinc blanks were accidental strike with the P for plated sword blanks, and plated sword blanks were accidental smitten without the P. These are not types but quite off alloy blank errors and when I list them I will list them as errors .

  1. 2006 non-magnetic …………………. PROOF     SOLD
     
  2. 2006 no P magnetic error …… ICCS red MS-63     SOLD
     
  3. 2006 P MAGNETIC ………………. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD
     
  4. 2006 LOGO MAGNETIC ………… ICCS red MS-67     SOLD
     
  5. 2006 LOGO NON-MAGENTIC …………. red MS-64     SOLD
Starting in 2007 all 1 cents have the Logo below the Queen ‘s portrait which I will not mention. Both Zinc ( non-magnetic ) and steel ( charismatic ) core blanks were used for circulation coins and can only be differentiated with a attraction. Non-magnetic examples were only about 1 % of the mintage so barely. Proofs are non-magnetic on solid copper or bronze. Specimen examples are all magnetic. Most proof-like examples are charismatic with a bright finish but some non-magnetic examples with a felt eat up are found in the hard tamp down mint sets .

  1. 2007 magnetic ………………….. SPECIMEN     SOLD
     
  2. 2007 non-magnetic matte finish …. PROOF-LIKE     SOLD
All 2008 circulation, proof-like and specimen examples are on magnetic steel kernel blanks. The only non-magnetic examples are the Proofs on upstanding copper or bronze blanks .

  1. 2008 magnetic …………………….. MS-64   $ 5.00
  2. 2008 magnetic …………………….. MS-65   $12.00
  3. 2008 magnetic ………………… PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.50
     
  4. 2008 non-magnetic …………………. PROOF     SOLD
2009 circulation assume cents occur both magnetic and non-magnetic. Proofs are on non-magnetic on upstanding copper or bronze blanks. Proof-like and specimen examples are on magnetic steel core blanks .

  1. 2009 magnetic ………………….. SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
     
  2. 2009 non-magnetic …………………. MS-60   $ 2.00
  3. 2009 non-magnetic ………. minor spots MS-62   $ 3.00
  4. 2009 non-magnetic …………………. MS-63   $ 5.00
All circulation hit 2010 cents ( MS ) are non-magnetic on bull plated zinc blanks with most examples showing a minor degree of surface imperfections due problems with the plating process. Proof strikes are besides non-magnetic on solid copper or tan blanks. Proof-like and Specimen strikes are constantly magnetic .

  1. 2010 non-magnetic ………. trace spots MS-64   $ 2.50
  2. 2010 non-magnetic …………………. MS-64   $ 5.00
  3. 2010 non-magnetic ………. trace spots MS-65   $ 6.50
  4. 2010 non-magnetic …………………. MS-65   $12.00
  5. 2010 non-magnetic …………………. PROOF   $13.50
     

In 2011 the mint stopped minting intentionally victor coins for Proof-like ( standard ) mint sets, rather using normal MS coins that had not gone through all the manage processes, resulting in most cents from these sets grading MS-64, although MS-65 examples are still scarce. With no way to differentiate between MS-63 or better coins from sets v rolls, and MS-64 and being common, I can not justify the higher prices earlier MS-64 examples. I cents of 2011 and 2012 I will price MS-63 at $ 0.50, MS-64 at $ 2.00 and MS-65 @ $ 12.00. Specimen coins assume with frost backgrounds and mirror designs I price slightly higher than the MS-64 monetary value at $ 4.00 .

Both copper plated zinc non-magnetic and copper plated steel charismatic 1 cents were minted in 2011 for circulation and in standard mint sets and once removed from the scroll or set can not be differentiated then I price them the same price. The specimen and proofread strikes have distinctive finishes and are scarcer indeed are priced higher. All Specimen strikes are on copper plated steel magnetic blanks. Proof strikes are on non-magnetic solid copper or bronze blanks .

  1. 2011 non-magnetic …………………. PROOF     SOLD

     

  2. 2011 magnetic …………………….. MS-63   $ 0.50
  3. 2011 magnetic …………………….. MS-64   $ 2.00
The characteristics and mint qualities are the same as for 2011, early than the all flatware proof sets one finds examples struck from silver with a brown overlie on the leaves. Those in normal proof sets are bronze allow and look like bronze .

  1. 2012 non-magnetic …………………. MS-63   $ 0.50
  2. 2012 non-magnetic …………………. MS-64   $ 2.00
  3. 2012 non-magnetic …………………. MS-65   $10.00
  4. 2012 non-magnetic …………………. PROOF   $16.00
     
  5. 2012 magnetic …………………….. MS-63   $ 0.50
  6. 2012 magnetic …………………….. MS-64   $ 2.00

Please note that up to 2010 I describe coins as Proof-like ( PL ) when from a batch place. PL coins are well differentiated by their superior strike and luster and although nice than MS coins from bank rolls are generally deserving less. ICCS and some references call these coins “ NON-CIRCULATING NUMISMATIC MINT STATE ” which I feel is confusing. Starting in 2011 the mint stopped making intentionally decent coins for standard batch sets, alternatively using MS ( mint express ) coins which had not gone though some of the normal mint handle procedures that leave marks on MS coins. Specimen and proof sets calm use specially strike coins, which have a very different complete .

Prices are in Canadian Dollars

orders shipped to addresses in Canada must add GST (or HST).

SHORTCUTS BACK TO SECTIONS

Victoria Large, 1858-1901
Edward VII Large, 1902-1910
George V Large, 1911-1920
George V Small, 1920-1936
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Elizabeth, 1953-1989
Elizabeth, 1990-2012

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